Tag Archives: yarn

Granny B’s Granny Purse

I have to admit to loving small purses for change and other bits and pieces, so after my clasp purse I thought I’d have a go at crocheting a granny square purse.  I always show folk on my workshops all the different things that you can do the humble granny square, and these little purses have to be one of the easiest.

To begin with, you need a granny square!!  The size of the square will depend on what size you want your finished purse to be and the number of rounds you have to crochet will also depend on the thickness of yarn that you’re using.  I still have an enormous stash of double knitting yarn, so decided to use that for my purse.

 

My top tip for working the first round of any granny square is to pop a hair grip into the circle you make when you join your 4 chain stitches together.  This is where you’ll be working all the trebles and it can sometimes be really hard to spot.  If you pop a hair grip in then you’ll always be sure of exactly where your hook needs to go.

Keep going until your square is the right size and don’t worry if the edges don’t look straight or the corners don’t look particularly pronounced.  All you need to do is block your granny square.  To do this, lay your square flat on the ironing board (or on one of those rubber children’s mats which are ideal) and pin it into shape.  Now just simply give it a steam with the iron, leave it to dry, and it will look beautifully crisp and square like!

The next step is to cut out your lining.  I laid my granny square on to my chosen fabric and cut it out leaving a good 1.5cm allowance all the way round.  I then ironed the seam allowance towards the wrong side of the lining fabric, and laid it onto the granny square so that the wrong sides were facing.  I popped a short piece of ribbon in under the lining at one of the corners, then carefully hand sewed the lining to the back of the granny square, making sure to secure in the ribbon.

Once the lining is secure you can fold in the bottom right and bottom left corner to the centre of the square and sew up the two edges.

All that’s left to do is to sew on a button and that’s your purse complete!

I just have to decide what to use it for now.   Maybe somewhere to store all my stitch markers perhaps?

Going Round in Circles

Over the past few months I’ve certainly made inroads into my yarn stash, but there’s still an awful lot left!  I got rid of quite a bit of the chunkier yarn when I used my peg loom to weave a couple of car mats, so I thought I’d have a go at a different type of weaving using an embroidery hoop this time.

To prepare your embroidery hoop for weaving, you take off the outer ring and leave to one side.  You then attach your warp thread (I used some DK yarn) to the top of the hoop and bring it down and under the rim directly opposite before bringing it back round to the front and up and under the top in a figure of eight pattern.  Each time you bring your warp thread back up to the top you need to move it roughly 2cm away from the last thread to produce evenly spaced ‘spokes’.  You can find a really useful video tutorial on how to do this here.

It’s important to make sure that you end up with an odd number of spokes on your hoop, or else your weaving won’t work.  Once you’re satisfied with the warp thread it’s time to put the outer ring of the hoop back on and tighten it to ensure your warp stays securely in place.

 

Now the fun starts!

The most effective weaving is made up using yarns of different thickness (although this really is personal preference).  I started out with DK weight which I’d threaded onto a darning needle.  Leaving a tail end of about 6cm, pass the yarn over and under the spokes and keep going for as many rounds as you like.  Make sure that  you end in roughly the same place as you started and you can tie the start and finish finish tail ends together on the back of your work to secure it.

Continue weaving making sure you maintain the pattern of over one spoke then under the next, and varying the yarn you use along the way.  As well as yarn you could try ribbon, shredded plastic bags, string, strips of old clothes etc.  I have quite a lot of wool tops from my spinning, so I popped some of that in too which gave a lovely texture to the finished item.  It wasn’t possible to thread the tops through a needle, but it was very easy to simple thread it over and under with my fingers.

Remember to keep pushing your work towards the centre of the hoop as you go to ensure you don’t have any holes in the middle, but it’s simply a case of keeping going until your hoop is full!

This was a really enjoyable project to make and I think next time I’ll experiment by adding some charms to the weaving too.  I love the fact that it has a ready made frame and is all ready to simply hang on the wall once you’re finished weaving 🙂

From Peg Loom to Leg Room!

Well I think my yarn stash must be magic – it seems no matter how much of the stuff I use, I still have bags of wool hiding under my table!

This time I thought I ought to use up some of the chunky wool I have, so I decided to make 2 little mats to go in the back of the car.

 

My lovely Dad had made me a little peg loom a while ago, so when Harry went out the other night I sat myself down in front of the telly and set to.

 

 

Peg loom weaving is wonderfully easy to do, and very therapeutic.  A small loom like mine fits nicely on your lap and you work with the weaving away from you so that it covers your legs as you go (all will become clear!)

To start, you need to thread each of the pegs in the loom with a long piece of yarn.  I used a darning needle to get my yarn through the holes and made sure that the yarn was plenty longer than the size I wanted my finished mat to be (this is to allow extra yarn to tie off the ends and make tassels).  You’ll end up with 2 strands of yarn hanging down from each peg and these are known as the warp threads.

Once your loom is set up, pop it on your knee, make sure you have a bag of yarn and a cup of tea to hand, tune in to Poirot, and you’re ready for the off!

To start, you simply weave your first colour in front and behind each of the pegs in turn.  When you come to the end of a row, bring the yarn round the last peg and continue the pattern.  Keep going for as many rows as you want with this colour.  Once you’re ready to change, get to the end of a row, trim the old yarn (leaving a nice long end to weave in), and attach your new colour with a slip knot just like in the picture above.  You’re now ready for the off again, making sure that  you keep the ‘in front then behind’ pattern correct as you go.  For neatness always change colour at the same edge of your loom.

 

As you weave, your work will progress up to the top of the pegs.  Once you’ve got to this stage, it’s time to clear the pegs to allow you to continue.

 

 

You do this by carefully lifting up one peg at a time from its hole, pushing the weaving down the warp threads and replacing the empty peg back into its hole.

Your work will slide safely down the warp threads and you just have to push it back up again once all the pegs are back in their holes.  You’re reading to continue weaving.  Repeat this process until your work reaches the required length.

To finish your work, take it off the pegs but don’t push it back up this time.  Instead make sure you leave a good 6 inches of warp thread showing and then snip the warp close to the pegs to remove them.  You should now have your weaving with long warp threads on either end.

 

In order to secure your weaving, you’ll need to knot tassels at either end.  To do this you take one warp thread from one channel, and one from the channel next to it, then knot them together (see the two single threads in the photo)

 

Do this at both ends of the weaving, then trim the tassels to whatever length you like.

All that’s left to do then is to weave in the loose ends on the back of the mat.

 

Once I finished my first mat, I made another the same size and they now have pride of place in the rear footwells in my car 🙂