Tag Archives: Liberty fabric

Granny B’s Granny Purse

I have to admit to loving small purses for change and other bits and pieces, so after my clasp purse I thought I’d have a go at crocheting a granny square purse.  I always show folk on my workshops all the different things that you can do the humble granny square, and these little purses have to be one of the easiest.

To begin with, you need a granny square!!  The size of the square will depend on what size you want your finished purse to be and the number of rounds you have to crochet will also depend on the thickness of yarn that you’re using.  I still have an enormous stash of double knitting yarn, so decided to use that for my purse.

 

My top tip for working the first round of any granny square is to pop a hair grip into the circle you make when you join your 4 chain stitches together.  This is where you’ll be working all the trebles and it can sometimes be really hard to spot.  If you pop a hair grip in then you’ll always be sure of exactly where your hook needs to go.

Keep going until your square is the right size and don’t worry if the edges don’t look straight or the corners don’t look particularly pronounced.  All you need to do is block your granny square.  To do this, lay your square flat on the ironing board (or on one of those rubber children’s mats which are ideal) and pin it into shape.  Now just simply give it a steam with the iron, leave it to dry, and it will look beautifully crisp and square like!

The next step is to cut out your lining.  I laid my granny square on to my chosen fabric and cut it out leaving a good 1.5cm allowance all the way round.  I then ironed the seam allowance towards the wrong side of the lining fabric, and laid it onto the granny square so that the wrong sides were facing.  I popped a short piece of ribbon in under the lining at one of the corners, then carefully hand sewed the lining to the back of the granny square, making sure to secure in the ribbon.

Once the lining is secure you can fold in the bottom right and bottom left corner to the centre of the square and sew up the two edges.

All that’s left to do is to sew on a button and that’s your purse complete!

I just have to decide what to use it for now.   Maybe somewhere to store all my stitch markers perhaps?

Like Hilda Ogden Loves Nosing

One of the things I’m loving about my 52 and Thrifty Too! project is that I’m finally getting to finish lots of WIPs that have lain for months (and sometimes years) in my stash.  This little embroidery started life four years ago on a holiday in the rather lovely village of Honeystreet, near Malborough in Wiltshire.

 

It’s a copy of one of Harry’s poems, and reads:

Like curtains love closing
Like models love posing
Like Hilda Ogden loves nosing
So do I love you!

I hand sewed the words freehand on a piece of linen cloth I had using 2 strands of embroidery thread.  The letters were worked in back stitch with french knots for the punctuation and dots on the i’s.  At the time I had no idea what I was going to do with the embroidery, but just enjoyed making it and added to it using what I had with me on holiday.

 

Once I’d finished the words, I folded over the edges of the white linen and centred it onto a piece of Liberty fabric.  I then hand sewed a piece of ribbon on top of the join.   Next I folded over the edges of the Liberty fabric which I then placed onto the teal background and sewed all the way around it with a decorative blanket stitch.  The last thing I did was to add a button to each of the four corners.

This was as far as I got on holiday, and the embroidery has been at the bottom of a basket since then!

When I rediscovered it recently I thought about turning it into a wall hanging, but in the end plumped for another cushion to add to my collection (or should that be obsession!)  After a rummage through my Liberty stash I realised I didn’t have enough of the same fabric to create the front and back of the cushion, so opted instead for 3 different patterns which you can see above.

To save a bit of money I was going to take the cushion pad out of one of the existing cushions on the sofa, but when I removed the cover the pad definitely looked the worse for wear, so instead I spent £1.75 of my budget to buy a new one.  The size of the pad was 45cm x 45cm so when I cut the fabric for the front I cut a 48cm x 48cm square (to allow for 1.5cm seams).   I also opted for another envelope back so cut out 2 rectangles 48cm x 34cm.  This would leave enough of an overlap to get the cushion pad in, but ensure both pieces would lie flat once the pad was safely inside.

 

 

Once I’d cut the fabric for the front of the cushion, I cut the rectangular teal fabric into a square shape, folded over the edges, centred it on the cushion front and used a decorative blanket stitch to attach it in place.

 

 

Now that my cushion front was complete, it was time to prepare the back.  To do this, I needed to hem the inside edges of both back pieces.  It was then simply a case of overlapping the back pieces and placing them snug against the front (right sides together) then sewing all the way around the square.

 

Once completed, I trimmed the seams and snipped the four corners before turning the cushion cover the right side out and pushing out the corners to make them as sharp as possible.

 

 

You can see the finished front and back of the cushion cover below:

 

And here’s what it looks like with the cushion pad inside and on the sofa!

 

9 into 1 – with no remainder!

Hidden in my Liberty stash was this rather lovely 9 patch cushion kit by Alice Caroline.  There are some absolutely stunning kits and other bits and pieces on her website (I particularly love the Tree of Life quilt) so it’s definitely worth taking a look – I defy you not to be tempted!

Now I haven’t actually done much patchwork before, and what I have done was a good few years ago.  However I bought some new cushions for the front room at Christmas and was keen to add to my burgeoning collection!  The kit comes with full instructions and everything you need apart from sewing cotton and the cushion pad itself which I bought for £4 from Dunelm.  The fabric is all beautiful Liberty designs and already cut to the right size.

Obviously if you want to use material you already have, you can make your squares any size you like, so long as they’re all identical, and that’s really important if you want nice straight edges and seams that match up.  The best way to cut them to size is using a rotary cutter and a quilting board and ruler.

The 9 patch design is probably one of the easiest patchwork patterns to start with, and this cushion features a basic envelope style back too, so there’s no zip involved either, making it an ideal project for a beginner.

As always, the fun comes in experimenting with fabric choices and deciding where you’re going to put the various pieces.  I had a good play about before deciding on the final layout for the 9 pieces.  Once you’ve made your mind up, it’s simply a case of sewing the top left square to the top middle square (right sides together), then sewing the top right square to the strip of 2 squares you’ve created (using 1/4 inch seams throughout) You repeat this with the middle and bottom rows so that you end up with 3 strips of fabric.  You can then iron the seams open.

Guess what?  Next you sew the 3 strips together so that you end up with one large square – easy eh?!  The trick however is making sure that all your seams line up.  I had to undo one of mine as the seams were out (you can see what I mean in the photo below).

Once you’re happy with the seams, you can iron them all open and you’re ready to tackle the back of the cushion.  The envelope opening is beautifully simple.  You need 2 rectangular pieces of fabric that will overlap by a good few inches allowing you to slide your cushion pad in and cover it up again.  You’ll need to hem one of the long edges on one of the rectangles, then do the same on the other (photo below left).

To complete the cushion, place one of the back pieces on to the front of the cushion (right sides together) then place the other back piece so that it lines up with the side of the cushion front and overlaps the other back piece (photo above right).  Pin or tack the back pieces to the front, then seam all the way around (again with a quarter inch seam).

In order to make the corners nice and sharp, trim them quite close to the seam, turn the cushion the right way round, then using a knife gently push the corners out.

 

In the photo on the right I’ve popped my needle case in the opening that overlapping the 2 back pieces creates so that you can see how you’ll be able to slide your cushion pad in.

 

 

All it needs now is a cushion pad inside, a little fluffing up and it’s ready for inspection by Coco!